Reports 

Innovation in Innovation 

The Future of Product/Service Design 

Innovation

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We are witnessing a shift in the traditional ‘innovation’ model – in so far as any single model could be said to have existed. This is to be welcomed, since various studies show a failure rate for innovation of between 40 and 90 percent. In fact, half of all businesses admit they are only ‘marginally effective,’ at converting R&D spending into actual products. Not only is product centric innovation generally ineffective, it ignores two important issues driving change – the rising servicization of products and the primacy of the consumer experience.

 
 
Feedback:
Amandine (Guest) 19/04/2017 14:25
Ce n'est pas étonnant, si la gestion de l'innovation est comme en France, subventionnée sans contrôle par des aides d'état. Juste pour les obtenir, il suffit de monter un dossier et voilà... L'intérêt n'est pas la réussite d'un projet innovant, mais bien l'acquisition d'argent publique. Cherchez l'erreur...
http://www.binghamton.edu/forum/history.html

Amandine (Guest) 19/04/2017 14:27
If you want to know, here my student profil
http://speechdebate.binghamton.edu/Users/1486/Profile/amandine-ellat/
mark lucas (Guest) 07/09/2017 18:07
Great innovation and initiations: Checkout our tips and guide for home ultilities http://buycom108.com/roomba-960-vs-880-what-to-buy/
Oliver Hammond (Guest) 16/09/2017 00:41
I liked the part about innovation in IT, and the insight that innovation is extremely inefficient without basing it around people's problems. Smart homes are slowly being adopted by the public. The most widely adopted tech is probably robotic vacuums, and those still have some limitations. Having said that, here is a rundown of the best robot vacuums available today: smartrobotichome.com/best-roomba-model-comparison-chart/ Nevertheless, the reason smart homes haven't yet achieved mass adoption is because they are still somewhat inconvenient to use. There is a lot of roomb for improvement.
Oliver Hammond (Guest) 16/09/2017 00:42
I liked the part about innovation in IT, and the insight that innovation is extremely inefficient without basing it around people's problems. Smart homes are slowly being adopted by the public. The most widely adopted tech is probably robotic vacuums, and those still have some limitations. Having said that, here is a rundown of the best robot vacuums available today: https://smartrobotichome.com/best-roomba-model-comparison-chart/ Nevertheless, the reason smart homes haven't yet achieved mass adoption is because they are still somewhat inconvenient to use. There is a lot of roomb for improvement.
Corentino (Guest) 20/09/2017 11:26
Innovation is hearth of world
http://www.vox-animae.com/liens
Amandine (Guest) 20/09/2017 15:35
http://www.doyoubuzz.com/amandine-ellat/cv/jobs
Eric Flona (Guest) 21/11/2017 05:42
Innovation which can't solve people problems is useless, but when it is useful and making things easier and reducing human effort, for those it is highly encouraging in the outside world. For example, as we all know vacuuming is one of those markets where automation have proven that they can be commercially successful.

Also, robot vacuums (automating cleaning machines) have experienced a huge massive growth in the consumer market, check out how competitive the robot vacuums market is: http://faceithard.com/best-roomba-models-comparison-chart.

Innovations useful to humans is development, but innovations, where there is a chance of destruction will lead to retrogression.